cripesyescycling

Nick here, cycling around the hills surrounding Bath UK. In a nice low gear, mostly.

Click here for all the posts sequentially or on 'Archive' just below for a pretty collage.

Sep 29
#bikeshopdog of the day is Monty down at Samways in Wimborne. With bonus Raleigh Burner

#bikeshopdog of the day is Monty down at Samways in Wimborne. With bonus Raleigh Burner


Key takeaway from @CycleShow: them new ‘aero’ helmets are REALLY getting customers excited

Key takeaway from @CycleShow: them new ‘aero’ helmets are REALLY getting customers excited


Sep 16
Here’s ‘Blunty’ at Falmouth Cycles. The cutest yet? #bikeshopdogs

Here’s ‘Blunty’ at Falmouth Cycles. The cutest yet? #bikeshopdogs


Sep 11
Looks like @WeAreDekaFrome really is opening in #bath 9am tomorrow

Looks like @WeAreDekaFrome really is opening in #bath 9am tomorrow


Sep 7
Pretty much what we’ll be doing in the morning ‘cept @veloclubwalcot happily has girls, too. Excellent vintage find by @classicretro.

veloclubwalcot are here on tumblr

Pretty much what we’ll be doing in the morning ‘cept @veloclubwalcot happily has girls, too. Excellent vintage find by @classicretro.

veloclubwalcot are here on tumblr


Sep 6

shitlesssherlock:

The Ride by Rodolph Guenoden


Aug 25

Amazing display of lowrider parts at Dan’s Cycles in Berwyn. They also have two vintage rotating cabinets of stickers. Bought an original ‘Dura-ace’ for the tool box #happyholidays


Aug 24
Essential cycling accessories: handlebar airplane. Inexplicably not available in 31.8 though

Essential cycling accessories: handlebar airplane. Inexplicably not available in 31.8 though


Aug 23
unconsumption:

Here’s a fascinating — if not exactly uplifting — look at the economics, business, and design strategies that led to our throwaway culture came about: Modern Waste is an Economic Strategy « Discard Studies:

About one third of MSW [municipal solid waste] —food scraps, and to a debatable extent, yard trimmings—are present in pre-modern waste.
The rest of modern MSW are disposables: paper, plastics, aluminum, textiles, and packaging.[i] In 1956, Lloyd Stouffer, editor of Modern Packaging Inc., famously (and controversially at the time) declared: “The future of plastics is in the trash can” (Stouffer 1963: 1).
Stouffer’s idea addressed an emerging problem for industry. Products tended to be durable, easy to fix, and limited in variation (such as color or style). With this mode of design, markets were quickly saturating (Packard 1960; Cohen 2003). Opportunities for growth, and thus profit, were rapidly diminishing, particularly after America’s Great Depression and the two World Wars, where an ethos of preservation, reuse, and frugality was cultivated.
In response, industry intervened on a material level and developed disposability through planned obsolescence, single-use items, cheap materials, throw-away packaging, fashion, and conspicuous consumption. These changes were supported by a regimen of advertising that telegraphed industrial principals of value into the social realm, suggesting the difference between durable and disposable, esteemed and taboo.
American industry designed a shift in values that circulated goods through, rather than into, the consumer realm. The truism that humans are inherently wasteful came into being at a particular time and place, by design. 

There’s a ton of great info in this piece, it really is a good read. The over-arching point is that the shifts are so massive that we can’t solve them via individual behavior-change (recycling, etc.) alone; we need policy-level solutions.
I half-agree: Yes, we need policy-level solutions, but we’re more likely to get there by way of individual-level action, behavior change, and engagement. Which is what this site encourages.

Interesting holiday reading: how we got wasteful

unconsumption:

Here’s a fascinating — if not exactly uplifting — look at the economics, business, and design strategies that led to our throwaway culture came about: Modern Waste is an Economic Strategy « Discard Studies:

About one third of MSW [municipal solid waste] —food scraps, and to a debatable extent, yard trimmings—are present in pre-modern waste.

The rest of modern MSW are disposables: paper, plastics, aluminum, textiles, and packaging.[i] In 1956, Lloyd Stouffer, editor of Modern Packaging Inc., famously (and controversially at the time) declared: “The future of plastics is in the trash can” (Stouffer 1963: 1).

Stouffer’s idea addressed an emerging problem for industry. Products tended to be durable, easy to fix, and limited in variation (such as color or style). With this mode of design, markets were quickly saturating (Packard 1960; Cohen 2003). Opportunities for growth, and thus profit, were rapidly diminishing, particularly after America’s Great Depression and the two World Wars, where an ethos of preservation, reuse, and frugality was cultivated.

In response, industry intervened on a material level and developed disposability through planned obsolescence, single-use items, cheap materials, throw-away packaging, fashion, and conspicuous consumption. These changes were supported by a regimen of advertising that telegraphed industrial principals of value into the social realm, suggesting the difference between durable and disposable, esteemed and taboo.

American industry designed a shift in values that circulated goods through, rather than into, the consumer realm. The truism that humans are inherently wasteful came into being at a particular time and place, by design.

There’s a ton of great info in this piece, it really is a good read. The over-arching point is that the shifts are so massive that we can’t solve them via individual behavior-change (recycling, etc.) alone; we need policy-level solutions.

I half-agree: Yes, we need policy-level solutions, but we’re more likely to get there by way of individual-level action, behavior change, and engagement. Which is what this site encourages.

Interesting holiday reading: how we got wasteful


Aug 19
'Nearly 11' Laura Curle at the end of the rainbow @SulisScorpions

'Nearly 11' Laura Curle at the end of the rainbow @SulisScorpions


Aug 18
Frank Lloyd Wright groupies step this way, please. This one is in LA but on Thursday I’m off to Chicago the FLW heartland. Can’t wait…

buddhistcyclist:

archatlas:

Hollyhock House Frank Lloyd Wright

Images by Joshua White

A rebirth for Wright’s first L.A. project, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House will reopen this fall following a $4.39 million “deep-tissue facelift.” read the full article by Sarah Amelar here.

I’d love to see it. I’ve been to Falling Water

(via buddhistcyclist-deactivated2014)


And then these gorgeous Swedish oldies found by Grant from Rivendell on his holidays…

rivbike:

Postcard From Sweden

[Grant’s been gone for a few weeks, sent this note from Sweden, pasted here for you. Skip to the end for exciting new 64cm Atlantis specs - Dave]

When you’ve seen one oldie, you still haven’t seen them all now, have you? It’s known by the RIVpeoplestaffers and anybody who’s emailed me and rec’d an autoreply that I’m in Sweden now & have been since 8/2, and it’s an ultra rare family vacation financed in part by a $6,000 book royalty (half a year’s sales), and the rest by friend and customer B, who lives here and spent half of our time taking us around to places not even Rick Steve knows about. It’s still expensive, but I sold a Gary Howells fly rod to help pay for it, too. Typically every dime beyond the barest basics goes to tuition, but Katie and Anna are home this summer and won’t be home again in the summer for years to come, and even boo-hoo maybe not for decades——-so this was our shot, and here we are.

At an antique shop today there was a Chinese ivory carving from the late 1800s, about 9-inches high, of a slender Eiffel-tower shaped towery thing made of carved animals and topped with about an inch-and-a-half diameter ball, with three additional balls—all intricately carved and seemingly perfect spheres, and each free-rolling and separate from its neighbors. I’ve always been a sucker for these things, The record is thirteen balls, and this one had just four, but hey.

I asked how much it was. The owner took it out of the case and handed it to me to inspect. I put it down carefully, and he told me it was (in USD) $1,800. But then he said, “That’s negotiable. Some people are rich and can afford it; others like you like it but aren’t rich, and I don’t mind cutting the price. Take a photo of it and think about it.” I’d like to show you my photo, but I left the memory card out of the Sony RX100 camera, so I only thought I got some good ones.

Of course I look at bikes and peek in bike shops when I find them. Yes, I’ve pedaled around Copenhagen, too, and I do all this with the curse that comes from being a one-trick pony bicycle guy, meaning every bike I see gets categorized within a second, and 99 of 100 get forgotten in the next second, because guess what—-the same carnage that’s happened in America has happened here. The fatt tubes, straight forks, tight clearances, and where’d the headset go? that afflicts most of our bikes also afflicts most of theirs.

And for the most part, the “old” bikes are from the eighties and nineties, with now and then a ’70s lugged Crescent or Monarch thrown in there, before both iconic Swedish brands went to China with everybody else. It’s all fine, but makes these other finds more remarkable. Here they are—two bikes shot with my wife’s iPhone after I discovered I’d forgotten to re-insert the mem card from my last downloading. There would’ve been more. That’s digital for you, but it makes sense for stuff like this. I brought film too, and Anna brought her Olympus OM-1 and her Mamiya 7II, if that means anything.

I’ll show the iphonepix here without commentary, because if they require it, it wouldn’t reach you—which is nobody’s fault, just a sad fact.

A point worth making and one that’s not obvious is that these bikes were probably nice in their day because somebody took some time with things that don’t, from a strictly function point of view, require it. That is KIND of what we’re trying to do, and it’s the thing you keep going when you buy something here, because that’s how it happens. This is not a plea to keep it up, just a pat on for what you’ve done.

The enduring beauty in these bikes is in the metal, for the most part. No amount of time can make it go away and leave these bikes generic. That’s a good thing about lugs, and nice looking ones at that. I had no idea this was going on in the ’40s or whenever these bikes were made.

I know there are some modern bikes that look nice, but nice or not, I don’t see the same stuff in them as I see in these. I’m not tricked by modern retro-attempts at artistry, by show bikes that are trying to romanticize the coal miner’s bike or the baguette-delivery boy’s bike, with—well, it’s not easy or nice to think or write descriptively about what I mean, and on the other hand, I’ve seen a zillion old bikes that don’t do it for me, either. I like our lugs, but I see them in a context in which they still don’t measure up to the art you see here, but they have their strengths, and the strengths are stronger now than they would have been then.

I also have some ideas for bikes that are wrong for the times, but in a couple of years I won’t care and we’ll do them, anyway. When you get this way and to this point, sometimes a creative-indulgent-impatient combo gets to you, and it’s easy not to care about the reaction—like, I just want to DO this, put out 500 of them, place them on the earth and then fast-forward the time machine and watch them age and continue to work and be beautiful old and as viable as bikes in fifty years as now. That’s not a clear explanation, but it’s clear in my head and I don’t have the time right now to work  it out. The last photo: Dig that chainstay-clamping C. The whole guard is more beautiful because it was never on a screen. Maybe this was a fop’s bike, it’s hard to say, but over time that part fades and this is what’s left, locked to a pole in Stockholm about a lifetime later, I’d say. Sorry I screwed up with the memory card, or there would have been more. Well….so much for “without commentary,” I guess, but what I meant was that I wasn’t going to point out details you’d see for yourself, anyway—-although I did do that with the C-clamp on that chainguard.

Official 2014 64cm Atlantis Geometry

Here’s the Current 64cm Atlantis Geometry, people have been emailing me:

72 seat x 72 head
48mm rake
upslope 2.5 deg
TT length   62.5
chainstay 48
drop 8cm

-Grant


Good grief! Look at this gorgeous Silca pump…  Must be bike show season coming up.

chirosangaku:

New Silca SuperPista Ultimate Floor Pump Inflates the Standard Good grief! Look at this gorgeous Silca pump… Must be bike show season coming up.

chirosangaku:

New Silca SuperPista Ultimate Floor Pump Inflates the Standard


Aug 17
We have an old friend out with us today

We have an old friend out with us today


Dug out overshoes, rainjackets, got dressed up, rode 100 yards, rain got even harder and colder, went back indoors #augustfail

Dug out overshoes, rainjackets, got dressed up, rode 100 yards, rain got even harder and colder, went back indoors #augustfail


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